4 aprile 2016

Überising terminology work

I found an old presentation from 2012 I submitted for my ECQA certification in terminology management. In that presentation (see below) I proposed the idea for a collaborative platform to improve terminology collaboration.

Since then nothing particularly impressive has been created, but I have a clear image in mind of how I would implement a collaborative terminology platform.

The expectations of quantity and speed of terminology deliveries have changed over the last years, and so have technologies: email and the internet have shortened the distance between a resource and the terminologist.

Very recently, collaborative platforms have brought researches and experts closer together in a common strategy, because terminology work has never been a solitary activity: terminologists need subject matter experts while subject matter experts often need the input from language specialists.

The opportunity of collaborative platforms for terminology management is remarkable: contribution, feedback and voting mechanisms can produce valuable input for many terminology scenarios. Of course, not all terminology tasks can be carried out on a collaborative platform.

A collaborative platform adapted to terminological needs would be so much useful to improve collaboration on terminology work. In being a networked, multiuser platform, it would contain functionalities enabling participants to share their knowledge quickly and efficiently. Ideally, terminologist can take the input by their colleagues and use it to produce terminological entries to be stored in termbanks and termbases.

The main asset of collaborative platforms is the amount of knowledge contained, access to which would not normally be open to a terminologist in his/her office.

A collaborative platform would also reduce the use of emails for terminology work in order to avoid the "depths" of email inboxes: valuable terminology conversations stay trapped in emails, being inaccessible by anyone else who might benefit from them. A collaborative platform captures this implicit knowledge so that it is never lost. Communication is thus made transparent by shifting communication scenarios into the content and social collaboration platform.

This video explains very well how a collaborative platform helps us to save time, confusion and frustration caused by emails:



Benefits from using a collaborative platform for terminology work:
  1.  Single point of access for documentations on terminology projects;
  2. discussion groups;
  3. sharing information through blog posts;
  4. sharing terminology resources;
  5. improving collaboration with subject matter experts for validation; and most interesting part:
  6. information integration and indexation of resources - a collaborative platform offers a combination of real-time data coming from the input of the users. A search functionality would suggests search results as the user types – pages, blog posts, files and documents, users everything would be immediately available.

9 febbraio 2016

Terminology: everywhere to be found, nowhere to be seen

Next Friday, on the 12th of February, I will be at the University of Verona for the workshop: ‘Il kit del traduttore, dalla teoria alla pratica’. The workshop is a free event providing translators with insights about the new frontiers of translation and how to improve branding and online visibility. The aim of the workshop is also to show translators how to leverage the combined power of machine translation and post-editing and to be aware of the importance of a good strategy in terminology management.
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The speakers will be Valeria Aliperta on personal branding, Marcello Federico on machine translation and post-editing, Licia Corbolante and me on terminology. I will talk precisely about terminology as not being anymore a mere instrument in support of translation, but as being crucial to other sectors as it is significantly evolving.
Check my post on TermCoord for more detailed info: Il kit del traduttore’, a workshop inVerona also on terminology"
Follow the event on Twitter: #KitTrad

11 gennaio 2016

Extract terms from a URL



This tool extracts the terms from one English web page retrieved from your URL. Some extracted and translated terms may not be relevant to you. If requested, the terms can be machine translated and stored in a monolingual or bilingual output format. The translation of these terms happens out of context, so most likely they need to be checked and corrected before using them in a translation production environment.
Technical Services & Management for the Translation Industry:




'via Blog this'

The Monco corpus search engine

The Monco corpus search engine: "Language changes as we speak. New words and new senses of familiar words are coined and recorded in dictionaries every year. Daily frequencies of 'content words' vary immensely as they are chosen to report events in the media. Words such as ‘vape’, ‘hangry’ or ‘emoji’ are either heavily under-represented or not present at all in reference corpora of English which were compiled only a few years ago. Also, within days, frequencies of words such as ‘migrant’ or ‘refugee’ may become relatively higher than ever before. Monco can help you keep track of such variation."



'via Blog this'

10 luglio 2015

Hacking your translations with glossaries

A glossary helps you to make sure that each time a defined term appears in your translation project, it is used consistently and correctly.

You have to spend time to save time.

Our whole career as modern-day translators spins around technological devices, and time is always short. Learning how to set up our CAT tools and every other translation software known to man, takes a lot of time.

Glossary editing, for example, is one of those time-consuming activities that we have to carry out in order to provide a good quality translation. It’s boring, but it proves to be an investment for later on because a glossary is THE reference for consistent terminology.

It requires a glossary to make sure that every translator uses the same term for the same concept overall the translation project and uses approved standardised terms for each target language.
    

Four reasons you should use a glossary:

1. Keep translations consistent.
 
2. Ensure that your brand is protected.
 
3. Speed up the translation process: when translators are confused, they have to ask questions. The process slows down. A clear glossary means that translators have fewer questions for you, which means that they work much faster.

4. Save on translation costs.

Moreover, a glossary becomes even more important if:
  •   you use more than one translation resource;
  • in case of short deadlines;
  • when many translators are working on the same project simultaneously.
  • the documents have to be provided in multiple languages. 
Glossaries, as you can see, help you working on standardising your content’s terminology, tone, style, and goes a long way toward saving you time. 


A good is a work in progress. If you have new terms that might benefit from a glossary entry, add them.
 
Good translation takes work. The more care you put in, the better translation you’ll get. A good glossary is a key step in creating a clear, consistent, readable translation:
Quality in, quality out.



9 giugno 2015

What vitamins can teach you about translation

Words are like vitamins, more effective in their natural context.

Vitamins naturally in food are not crystalline and never isolated. Vitamins found in any real food are chemically and structurally different from those commonly found in ‘natural vitamin’ formulas and are far superior to their synthetic counterparts.

As vitamins, words, taken within their natural context, are more effective and useful.
“Any time you touch a word, you use it in a new context, you give it a new connotation…You didn't break it. It's just in a new position, and that new position can be just as beautiful”

says Erin Mac Kean in an epic TEDTalk

In other words, context beyond the words immediately surrounding a term, is definitely relevant.

How can you get maximum benefit from using words in their natural context in a translation project? By using concordances. The added value of using concordances is that they are not as “static” the way dictionary definitions are: concordances analyse different use of a single word, word frequency and phrases or idioms in their natural context.

By using concordances, translators can identify terms in the most appropriate context and easily find the best equivalent terms in the target language.



7 maggio 2015

From Rags to Riches - A terminology blogger's true success story

Do you know that Patricia Brenes is here in Luxembourg with me? I mean, what's going on with this blogging and social media activity is simply amazing! Only last year we were sending each other messages on Twitter and now she took a flight from Washington to come to visit Termcoord (and me)! I can't stop to be surprised for how many wonderful opportunities I am getting since I started running this blog and using Twitter to share my passion for terminology! And this is actually what Patricia is going to say tomorrow in occasion of her presentation at the European Parliament: Building a blog on terminology: from rags to riches.

For those wordlovers based in Luxembourg, you can come tomorrow, Friday 08 May at 11:00 am at Schuman Building to meet Patricia and learn how to get the best from blogging and social networking in the area of terminology.

For those who still don't know her, Patricia is a full-time Translation Assistant in the quality control unit at the Inter-American Development Bank in Washington, DC. She is an ECQA certified Terminology Manager and owns a blog on terminology: In my own terms, that provides information on terminology such as glossaries, resources, biographies, infographics, theory and practice, etc.

This is a great opportunity to learn how to improve your online visibility, to build your network, share your passion, find other people with your passion and eventually increase the chances to find a job in your sector!

Join us tomorrow at 11:00 am at Schuman SCH L2A200 and feel free to come to visit us to meet Patricia!


26 gennaio 2015

Trust the network - it probably knows more than you do

Social media and blogs enable us to easily focus on the latest news and trends on terminology, providing us with regular updates. 

This is the most important aspect emerged at the EAFT Terminology Summit, organised by TERMCAT, the Catalan Terminology Organisation in Barcelona, last November. The topic for 2014 was: How does social networking affect terminology work?

In recent years social networks have burst into life, and into terminology work, too. Terminological work and its dissemination are no exception. This is why the international terminology community opened a debate about the impact of social media on all spheres of terminology work, from research all the way through to dissemination.
According to Anita Nuopponen's presentation:
  • Social networks, if properly used, can be effectively used to find terminological resources.
  • Blogs are useful to provide own opinions, reflections and for being an optimal environment for discussing different points of view.
  • Twitter allows us to disseminate information, get visibility, link to useful information, follow interesting conferences we cannot attend through live-tweeting updates.
Related to Anita Nuoppen's presentation, there was a moment of great fun for me: she was listing the most reliable resources for terminology reseach and this list included, among the others, me!! I blushed and felt so honoured that she mentioned me as an excellent example of Twitter usage for terminology! 

Back to the conference, in brief, lessons learned:
  • Let's share knowledge! Disconnected experts are invisible to the network and irrelevant to the system (@ictlogist).
  • Let’s leverage the power of blogging! Blogs are usually more timely than newspapers in discussing new topics and concepts and crucial to raise awareness on the importance of terminology (@terminologia).
I provided a more detailed information about the Terminology Summit on the post: People have the power: the crowd-powered terminologist on the TermBloggers Lounge.

If you like this topic, you can find a lot of interesting suggestions in this post: Social media tips for translators and interpreters, by +Gala Gil Amat, where she explains her fresh and innovative approach to communication, that one that only ‘millenials’ have as natural talent.

For best practices on how to get the most from social networks as a translator, I invite you to read also:
Both post are on +Caroline Alberoni 's blog: Carol'sadventures in translation, a valuable resource providing tips and tricks for translators.


16 gennaio 2015

Terminology is the new black

Hi word lovers and happy New Year! it is never too late to wish you to have all the fun you can and a wonderful year ahead! After being inactive on this blog for almost two months due to much work - Christmas holidays - job change in progress (wish me luck!) and a hairdresser that messed up my hair (she made me blonde!!), I'm finally back (and black again)! :D 


First of all, thanks for making this blog great and for following me on Twitter: I almost reached 2200 followers!
Second, new Year's resolutions: I want to catch up with my blog, I have so many draft posts pending, new tools to add to the terminology tools page and maybe a new layout!

My last post was about the Terminology Summit in Barcelona: I was just announcing that I was going to attend it and then I just live-tweeted it. Since the conference was so great, it deserves more than tweets. I will provide you as much information as I can about what I learned, both on this blog and on the TermBloggers Lounge.

What is the TermBloggers Lounge?
It is an informal platform hosted by Termcoord for anyone who is passionate about terminology, likes to share their insights and expertise, and wants to raise awareness of terminology work, terminology quality or just getting familiar with terminology.



Why is terminology the new black?
Terminology has a key role for successful communication. Check for example this abstract from this post: Looking back on 2014 by Massimo Ghislandi (SDL): 
One surprise for me in 2014 is the popularity of terminology. For all the innovations, one of the oldest topics which is guaranteed to attract interest is terminology. Is it because there is increased quality focus? Or is terminology seen as way to improve the speed of the overall translation process (cutting down on those review cycles!)? I am not sure. All I know is that for all the content and activities we have generated in 2014, terminology has been at the top of the chart. From the webinars with Kara Warburton to the terminology eBooks, infographics and OpenExchange apps, terminology seems to continue to attract an incredibly high amount of interest.
Read also this abstract from the presentation of the conference: Quo vadis, Terminologia?

“Terminology work seems to us to be very close to translation, in that both are, like Flaubert’s author “everywhere to be found, nowhere to be seen”. Like translation, the history of terminology is similar to the history of the nation: language survival and language construction both depend on the capacity of language to name all of the objects of its reality (Michel Serres). Everybody does terminology, and everyone uses terms, even if this is often done unknowingly in an act of carefree naivety or perhaps even careless denial”

I also invite you to read this post: Terminology matters everywhere by Termcoord.

Another reason for that success is to be found, in my opinion, in terminology as being part of web content management and SEO. Bad quality terminology in web content and UI means no visibility on search engines, no visitors accessing websites, and user frustration.

Another trend is that LSP providers are putting more effort in terminology management and terminology research. They are starting to embed terminology tools directly in their translation workbenches, thus preventing translators from leaving their workbench for searching online.

TermCoord (TermCoord), Patricia Brennes (InMyOwnTerms) and Licia Corbolante (Terminologia etc.have carried out many initiatives - blogs, publications, presentations, workshops, linking and showcasing authors and resources, interviews to terminologists and much more - to raise awareness on the importance of terminology.

Now it’s your turn! Tell us what you think about terminology!

Drop us an email, a post, and article, a tweet, a comment blog, or write about terminology in your own space (Facebook, Tumblr, Google+ etc.), then let us know about it (including anything you might have already published on the topic in the past), by linking to it in the comments below the post on TermBloggers Lounge or emailing: dgtrad.termcoord@europarl.europa.eu .

The editing committee (Me, Licia Corbolante, Patricia Brenes and Termcoord) will publish a round-up of all relevant contributions and any other useful links.

25 novembre 2014

Terminology Summit 2014

I'm going to enjoy the best Terminology Conference ever!! I'm so happy I can't write anything! Check the Twitter stream below to be updated on this event! Hasta luego!!

Terminology Summit 2014