Passa ai contenuti principali

No more up all night to get lucky

The subject field of terminology is so overwhelming that it is easy to get infoxicated (lost with so much information).

To prevent spending nights on searching on the internet, more and more institutions, researches, companies  and simply passionate people, are taking the initiative to develop websites and blogs applying, in the words of Google, the “I’m feeling lucky” approach: to find the information that you are looking for in one-stop shop website. (Hi Patricia! I stole this expression from your blog, I really love it!).

So, look no further and enjoy using those resources that best embody, in my opinion, the “feeling lucky” approach.

Terminology Forum: Terminology Forum is a global non-profit information forum for freely available terminological information online. The Forum, maintained by Anita Nuopponen with the help of her students at the Dept. of Communication Studies, University of Vaasa, Finland, provides information on terminological activities including terminology work, research and education, online glossaries and termbanks from different fields as well as on general language dictionaries in various languages. 
Strong point: Just check Terminological Organisations, TerminologicalEducation and Bibliography, nowhere you can find such an amount of information. Really very well done.   

In My Own Terms: This newborn blog deserves all our attention even only for the enthusiasm of its creator: Patricia Brenes.  The blog provides sources to basic information on terminology, glossaries, resources which have useful sources or bibliography at the end. 
Strong point: Frequently updated, fresh material added every day (and she quotes me among the resources ^_^).

Termcoord.eu: How not to mention Termcoord? The staff of the Terminology Coordination Unit of the European Parliament, with the help of the trainees, never stops surprising you by providing resources from the EU and not only, a weekly selection of terms from the EU terminology database IATE related to current events, news from most important conferences on terminology and a lot of useful tools such as the frequently-updated list of selected glossaries, Glossary Links
Strong Point: It is the Mecca of terminology, what else?

Taus Directory: TAUS just released this new directory of translation technologies as a free and open service to the global translation industry. The directory contains listings of translation support tools, machine translation engines and language technology tools. It is not strictly related to terminology but of course terminology is directly involved as a lot of resources are listed. 
Strong Point: I was just impressed by the fresh and minimal look and I have to say that this is how a real “feel lucky” layout should be: white background, fresh vivid colours, flat design, html5 (looks like) and just a search box and four buttons to refine your search.

Update 09/05/2014 - Lingua Greca Toolbox: I definitely had to add this impressive list of resources by Catherine Christaki. Everybody in the online language community knows her and loves her because she always tries to help by sharing useful resources, recommend potential clients and so on.
Strong Point: It is very hard to put such an amount of resources in one page and Catherine successfully managed to do that. Here you don't have the sensation of being lost.
Take also a look to the section weekly favorites to be updated on latest news, interesting blog posts and online articles on translation, interpreting, language, as well as freelancing, blogging, business and social media. If you missed any of the great content, here is your chance to catch up.



Commenti

  1. Thank you for the mention. Your earlier advice has really paid off. ¡Gracias!

    RispondiElimina
    Risposte
    1. Looking forward to reading your Fabulousness! ^_^

      Elimina
  2. Thank you so much for the kind mention Maria, you definitely made my week! :)

    RispondiElimina
  3. You deserve it, Catherine! You are always so nice!

    RispondiElimina

Posta un commento

Post popolari in questo blog

Differenza tra football e soccer

Perché il calcio viene chiamato in modo diverso da inglesi (football) e americani (soccer)?

I due termini, football e soccer, si usano per indicare lo stesso sport sebbene football sia presente in un maggior numero di lingue con un più alto numero di occorrenze.

Footballrisale a un decreto del 1424 in cui re Giacomo I di Scozia bandiva il gioco con la frase: "That na man play at the Fute-ball".

Nel 1863 viene fondata a Londra la Football Association (FA), la prima federazione calcistica nazionale che unificò definitivamente il regolamento. Queste regole furono adottate da tutti eccetto che dalla Scuola di Rugby, che preferiva un gioco più fisico in cui si potesse toccare il pallone anche con le mani. Si venne a creare cosi il termine soccer, entrato a far parte dello slang universitario comeabbreviazione colloquiale di Assoc., da  Association football+ la formazione agentiva "-er" per distinguerlo dal Rugby Football.

Fonti:


Terminologia etcEnglishfor.it





Football or soccer, which came first?

With the World Cup underway in Brazil, a lot of people are questioning if we should refer to the "global round-ball game" as "soccer" or "football"? This is visible from the queries of the readers that access my blog. The most visited post ever is indeed “Differenza tra football e soccer” and since we are in the World Cup craze I think this topic is worth a post.

According to a paper published in May by the University of Michigan and written by the sport economist Stefan Szymanski, "soccer" is a not a semantically bizarre American invention but a British import.

Soccer comes from "association football" and the term was used in the UK to distinguish it from rugby football. In countries with other forms of football (USA, Australia) soccer became more generic, basically a synonym for 'football' in the international sense, to distinguish it from their domestic game.

If the word "soccer" originated in England, why did it f…

You are doing terminology management all wrong. Here is why

We all know the never-ending, love-hate relationship between translators and terminology… now, let’s explore some of the most common errors.
Generally speaking, when thinking of terminology, we imagine a glossary, made of two parallel columns full of terms, with the source language on one side and the target language on the other.

Easy.

And what better than an Excel file for this type of structure? Seems easy and intuitive enough. Plus, you can also add an extra column to the right, to add comments or other notes.

Well, there’s something wrong here: Excel was never designed to store text, much less terminological data.

Yes, you guessed it… Excel was created to crunch numbers, not words!

Using Excel files is not an effective or efficient way to manage complex databases. If you use it to create glossaries as mentioned above, you will not be able to specify additional attributes for those terms. It is indeed possible to add extra columns but always limited to one field or category for ea…